News Archive

24th December 2003
Illuminating The Renaissance: The Triumph Of Flemish Manuscript Painting In Europe brings together some of the greatest works of the quintessential medieval art form, painted between 1470 and 1560. In the wake of the invention of printing, Flemish illuminators created extravagant...
17th December 2003
Foreign Office Architects: Breeding Architecture is the first British exhibition of the work of the architectural practice founded ten years ago by Alejandro Zaera Polo and Farshid Moussavi. Hailed as the "coolest architects in the world" by The Times, they are the most successful...
10th December 2003
Roadside Architecture is an exhibition of recent photography by John Margolies, who has been recording disappearing vernacular architecture in a one man odyssey across America for over 30 years. Commercial outlets designed to look like the products they purveyed - such as a gigantic...
26th November 2003
Christmas Past: Seasonal Traditions In English Homes is a glimpse of the traditions, rituals and decorative styles of Christmases over the last 400 years, from kissing under the mistletoe to decorating the tree and throwing cocktail parties. Twelve rooms in the Grade 1 listed group...
19th November 2003
Thomas Jones In Italy features the work of one of the most innovative, yet least known British artists from the second half of the 18th century. Jones small oil-sketches, painted during travels around Italy in the 1770s and 1780s, are masterpieces of observation and concision, ...
12th November 2003
Architecture Unshackled: George Dance The Younger 1741-1825 reveals the range and variety of work by a man hailed as 'the most complete poet-architect of his day'. George Dance produced many groundbreaking designs for both public and private buildings. In his exteriors, as well...
5th November 2003
It's A Great Night Out! The Making Of The West End 1843-2010 celebrates the development of London's Theatreland, and the fires, murders, paranormal happenings (and plays) that have taken place in these fine buildings. It tells the story of how the West End came to have over 40 ...
29th October 2003
Women And War examines women's involvement in conflict in the 20th century, charting their changing roles from home front to front line. It tells the story of servicewomen, nurses, land girls, factory workers, secret agents, pilots and peacekeepers from the First World War to the...
22nd October 2003
Saved! 100 Years Of The National Art Collections Fund celebrates the centenary of the National Art Collections Fund by bringing together over 300 masterpieces which have been saved for the nation with the Fund's help. Spanning 4,500 years of great works of art from prehistoric ...
15th October 2003
Gothic: Art For England 1400-1547 celebrates late medieval art from the reign of Henry IV to the reign of Henry VIII, the period brought to life by Shakespeare's history plays. It shows how the wealth and patronage of monarchs, aristocrats, the Church and merchants made this one...
8th October 2003
Sigmar Polke: History Of Everything showcases recent work by one of Germany's most significant artists, who incorporates something often lacking in both contemporary art and Germans - humour. Since the early 1960s Polke has experimented with a wide range of styles and subject matter...
1st October 2003
Peter Paul Rubens: A Touch Of Brilliance is devoted to Rubens oil sketches, long regarded as one of the most remarkable aspects of his work. They illustrate the wide range of his preparation, and reveal the development of his pictorial ideas. By bringing together preparatory material...
24th September 2003
Pre-Raphaelite And Other Masters: The Andrew Lloyd Webber Collection is the first public exhibition of over 300 works by Pre-Raphaelite and other masters from one of the largest collections in private hands. Spread over 11 galleries, it features paintings by Millais, Rossetti, ...
17th September 2003
The Lord Of The Rings Motion Picture Trilogy - The Exhibition provides a behind the scenes look at how the world of Middle Earth was created, and demonstrates the technologies employed to enable the characters to be brought to life. On a straightforward level there are hundreds...
10th September 2003
Rock: A Retrospective Of Jane Bown's Rock And Pop Portraits (1963-2003) does exactly what it says on the tin, displaying a selection from the archive of portrait photographs by the legendary Jane Bown spanning five decades of musical history. Highlights include pictures of The ...
3rd September 2003
The Tate has embarked on a project to provide online access to its Archive for the first time, with an initial 4,000 objects. A searchable Showcase offers an opportunity to explore the whole range of the material, and three themed Journeys provide an insight into Tate's History...
27th August 2003
From Palace To Parlour: A Celebration Of 19th Century British Glass is the first exhibition in London to illustrate the extraordinary diversity and sumptuousness of Regency and Victorian British glass. The multitude of new manufacturing and decorative techniques of the period are...
20th August 2003
A Gardener's Labyrinth: Portraits Of People, Plants And Places displays recent photographs by Tessa Traeger and Patrick Kinmonth of over 50 British horticulturalists and their work. The Garden Proposed examines the attitudes and inspirations that inform contemporary garden design...
13th August 2003
Clarence House, which is the last great remaining aristocratic London town house, was the residence of the Queen Mother for nearly half a century. Before that, it was the first home of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh (where Princess Anne was born), and it has now been refurbished...
6th August 2003
Peter Blake: Commercial Art 1960-2003 is a retrospective of the commercial work of one of the inspirational figures in the Pop movement of the 1960s, who created some of the most imitated images of the last century. Blake's work extends across a diverse range of media, including...
30th July 2003
T.rex: The Killer Question asks whether everyone's favourite dinosaur was really the bloodthirsty predator he has been made out to be, or whether might he have been just a 12,000lb, 12ft tall, softie scavenger, clearing up other dinosaur's leftovers. This is a new theory put forward...
23rd July 2003
Ossie Clark celebrates the work of the fashion designer whose most productive period coincided with London's magical, optimistic, rule-breaking decade, in which fashion, photography, music and the cult of personality converged. From 1965 to the mid 1970s Ossie Clark dressed the famous...
16th July 2003
Medicine Man: The Forgotten Museum Of Henry Wellcome is a celebration of the British passion for collecting things. Henry Wellcome, the pharmacist, entrepreneur and philanthropist, saw human culture and history through medical eyes. A compulsive collector and traveller, he built...
9th July 2003
Bridget Riley celebrates the 40 year career of one of Britain's most distinctive artists. Since she invented what became known as Op Art in the 1960s, Riley has continued to develop optically vibrant paintings that engage the viewer's sensations and perceptions. Riley's work falls...
2nd July 2003
London 1753 is part of the British Museum's 250th birthday celebrations, aiming to create a picture of London at the time of its foundation, when London was the largest city in the western world - containing 11% of the British population. The display of over 300 objects is arranged...
25th June 2003
Museum In Docklands has brought back to life one of Britain's oldest surviving warehouses - No 1 Warehouse, West India Quay. Built 200 years ago to store and handle coffee, rum, molasses and sugar, today it houses over 2,000 years of history, exploring the story of London's river...
11th June 2003
The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is with us again, as it has been every year since 1769 - the usual collection of the good, the bad and the ugly - from amateurs to RA's, proving that popular taste and critical approval find no meeting point. Around 1200 works covering paintings...
28th May 2003
Leonardo Da Vinci: The Divine And The Grotesque is the first to British exhibition focus on Leonardo's life-long obsession with the human form. Through his drawings and notes, often made at the dissecting table, he attempted to define perfect or 'divine' proportion. At the same...
14th May 2003
Elizabeth brings together over 350 objects in the greatest collection ever assembled of personal items, paintings, jewellery, manuscripts, fine art objects and exhibits exploring the life and reign of Elizabeth I. Under the guest curatorship of current historical authority hottie...
30th April 2003
Linley Sambourne House has reopened after a two year conservation and restoration programme, and now includes the studio. It is a fine example of a late Victorian London townhouse in Classical Italianate style, with four floors above a basement, and it survives with almost all ...
23rd April 2003
Guy Bourdin is the first retrospective of the influential French photographer known for dramatic fashion photographs, which owe more to documentary reportage than high gloss. Instead of the studio shot or glamorous location, his pictures look like Crime Scene Investigation officers...
16th April 2003
Damien Hirst, a retrospective of the man with the formaldehyde is the exhibition which launches what will undoubtedly be the gallery of the year. Charles Saatchi has moved his collection from Boundary Road to the cultural heart of London on the South Bank. It comprises most of ...
9th April 2003
Marilyn Monroe - Life Of A Legend is the world premiere of the biggest ever exhibition devoted to the life of the ultimate screen icon. Showcasing more than 250 works from over 70 artists and photographers, alongside films and memorabilia, it charts every stage of Monroe's life...
3rd April 2003
Roy Lichtenstein is the first major retrospective of the American father of Pop Art in the UK for 35 years. Lichtenstein shot to international fame with his paintings based on cartoon characters - Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Popeye - but it was his blown up comic strip scenes...
2nd April 2003
Art Deco 1910-1939 is the first assessment in this country of the first truly global art movement, which was launched at the Paris International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in 1925, as the way of the future, combining streamlining and extravagance. It started in the gallery with...
26th March 2003
John Soane And The Wooden Bridges of Switzerland: Architecture And The Culture Of Technology From Palladio To The Grubenmanns springs from a journey through Europe made by Soane in 1778 while he was a student of architecture. In Switzerland he saw a number of remarkable wooden ...
12th March 2003
Puppet Worlds puts one of the oldest theatrical traditions into a global context, and also illustrates that its audience is by no means restricted to children. Every kind of puppet is here, from British end of the pier Punch and Judy, whose ancestry is much more complex than you...
5th March 2003
The Adventures Of Hamza is a display of paintings illustrating epic tales of heroism, magic and bravery. They depict the exploits of Hamza, a mythical character, supposedly the uncle of Muhammad, who travelled the world with his band of heroes battling against a host of adversaries...
26th February 2003
The Glass Aquarium is an exhibition of the work of 19th Century glass makers Leopold Blaschka and his son Rudolf, who made thousands of glass models of squids, sea-slugs, cuttlefish, jelly fish and other sea creatures from their tiny studio in Desden. Exquisite in its fine detailing...
19th February 2003
Julia Margaret Cameron: 19th Century Photographer Of Genius showcases the work of one of the most important, yet least known figures in the history of photography. Presented with a camera as a gift from her daughter, at the age of 48 she embraced photography with a passion bordering...
12th February 2003
Kazari: Decoration And Display In Japan 15th - 19th Centuries is an exploration of the Japanese art and experience of arranging and displaying decorative objects. Kazari refers not only to the object, but also to its use in specific settings and contexts, and requires the active...
5th February 2003
Manola Blahnik is the ultimate fusion of art and commerce - the first museum retrospective of the work of the most fashionable shoe designer in the world. Sensationally sexy yet impeccably elegant, his shoes are perfectly proportioned feats of technical virtuosity and craftsmanship...
29th January 2003
Giorgio de Chirico And The Myth Of Ariadne charts a man's obsession with a subject, which he first painted in 1912, and was still pursuing over 100 paintings later in 1970. According to legend, Ariadne was abandoned by her lover Theseus on the desert island of Naxos, after he had...
22nd January 2003
David Hockney: Five Double Portraits is a double celebration, marking the return to Britain of one of our most globally successful artists, and the discovery of (for him) a new medium - watercolour. Relishing the possibilities and restrictions of watercolour, these portraits are...
15th January 2003
Unseen Vogue: The Secret History Of Fashion Photography has been produced by sifting through over one and a half million unused images in the archive of the fashion bible British Vogue. From first efforts by famous photographers and great pictures by forgotten ones, to out-takes...
8th January 2003
Marcus Gheeraets II: Elizabethan Artist is the first solo exhibition to consider the work of this important but little known late Elizabethan and Jacobean immigrant Flemish artist. This is all the more surprising since Gheeraets produced some of the most haunting portraits in British...
2nd January 2003
Arthur Rackham celebrates the work of one of the world's most popular artist-illustrators, who produced some of the finest colour book illustrations of the early twentieth century. His interpretations of Rip Van Winkle, Peter Pan, Alice In Wonderland, A Midsummer Night's Dream ...